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Meeting the demand for skilled workers

Posted by Anthony Benoit on Mar 29, 2016 1:00:00 PM


From the national to local level, we need to train more people for jobs that require more than a high school education, but not a four-year college degree. These are the biomedical technicians fixing diagnostic equipment at your hospital; the computer support specialists keeping your company’s IT infrastructure fast and secure; the master electricians and HVAC experts outfitting your home and office; and the automotive technicians using complex software to diagnose and repair your car.


 From the national to local level, we need to train more people for jobs that require more than a high school education, but not a four-year college degree.


These jobs will drive the economy. In 2012, jobs that require more than a high school diploma, but less than a four-year degree made up 46% of the labor market and are projected to remain at this level through 2020. However, only 37% of the population holds the appropriate training to fill these positions. This is the “skills gap” often mentioned by media and politicians.

Some traditional two-year colleges have started to launch training programs and associate degree programs in high-demand technology industries. These are indeed an important piece to the puzzle. However, it’s not enough to simply offer these career pathways or to make them less expensive.

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Ben Franklin's living legacy

Posted by Anthony Benoit on Mar 22, 2016 5:00:00 PM


The U.S. Founding Father, Benjamin Franklin, is often associated with the city of Philadelphia. The city where he helped draft the Declaration of Independence, participated in the Constitutional Convention, and performed scientific research. But Ben Franklin’s early life in Boston left a legacy that lives on today.

As a young Bostonian, Franklin was unable to afford traditional education. He became an apprentice in the printing trade, working with his brother James to establish an independent newspaper, The New England Courant. A sibling quarrel with James led to a split that resulted in Ben’s move to Philadelphia and the rest, as they say, is history. His early training, tireless work ethic, and infinite curiosity helped him become tremendously successful personally and alter the course of the young nation.


Ben Franklin's early life in Boston left a legacy that lives on today.



Despite these accomplishments, Franklin recognized the value of his apprentice experience, as well as the kindness of two friends in helping him set up his business, which became the basis of his fortune. In preparation for his death, he made a financial commitment in his will to help “in forming and advancing other young men that may be serviceable to their country.”

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